Difference between US and Japan

Difference+between+US+and+Japan

Mana Konishi , Olytimes writer

    It’s been 8 months since I came to the US, and I learned a lot about cultural differences. First, I was surprised that there’s summertime in the US. There’s no summertime in Japan, so I saw the moment when the time changed on my phone. Also, I was surprised that the US has a time difference.  Second, I was shocked that I can wear shoes inside the house. In Japan, no one enters the room with their shoes on. This was my first culture shock. Third, I felt that America is ladies first compared to Japan. I often saw a man opening a door to a woman and I was surprised. I thought that more Japanese men should be like American men. Fourth, in Japan, there’s no tip culture. When I first made a payment, I didn’t know what the tip was so I was panicking. Fifth, I was shocked that it was okay to return the item. In Japan, some stores accept returning items, but most of the stores don’t accept them. I hope that Japan will have more stores that can return items like the US. I’m having so much fun learning American culture and I love it.

Something extra

   I’m going to write about the differences in greeting between the US and Japan. There are various patterns of greetings in the US such as handshakes and hugs, and in Japan, verbal greetings, gratitude, and handshakes are common. To be honest, I knew about the difference because I often watch American movies. But I heard there’s a difference in how to shake hands. Also, the way of hugging is a little different depending on the other party.“When shaking hands, the three points are to snake your hands strongly for men and gently for women, shake up and down only once, and look at the other person’s eyes.” One of my friends said.” We hug when we meet people or when we say goodbye. We look at each other and hug for a few seconds. Also, it’s NG to hug from a man to a woman.” In Japan, we shake hands many times instead of once as in the US. I didn’t know about the details of how to shake hands or about hugs, so I’m glad I learned something new.